Manna Storehouse
"For the bread of God is He which cometh down from Heaven, and giveth life unto the world."  John 6:33



Main


Barley is high in B vitamins, potassium, and soluble fiber. The type of barley found in supermarkets and health food stores is called pearl or pearled, which means that the outer hull and bran have been removed, leaving the pearl, or endosperm. (Unpearled barley is used for animal feed.)

Cook: 1 cup in 3 cups boiling water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for 45 minutes (quick cooking barley takes 10 minutes).
Yield: 3 cups
Uses: soup, side dishes



Bulgur is a form of cracked wheat that has been parboiled. Like cracked wheat, bulgur is high in protein and fiber, but it cooks faster. It is available in the pasta and rice sections of most supermarkets and also in health food stores.

Cook: 1 cup bulgur in 2 cups boiling water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for 10 minutes. Remove from heat and let stand, covered , 10 minutes more.
Yield: 3 cups
Uses: cereal, salads, side dishes.



Cornmeal comes in two colors: white and yellow. While yellow cornmeal contains more beta carotene than the white, both take the same amount of time to cook. Corn that is ground under millstones is called stone-ground cornmeal.

Cook: Stir 1 cup into 2 cups cold water until smooth. Add the mixture  to 1 ¾ cups of boiling water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for 15 minutes.
Yield: 3 ¼ cups.
Uses: cereal, side dishes, baking.



Cracked Wheat is prepared by cutting whole-wheat berries into small pieces. It does not require soaking before cooking. High in fiber and nutrients, cracked wheat is available in health food stores.

Cook: 1 cup cracked wheat in 2 cups boiling water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for 20 minutes.
Yield: 2 ½ cups.
Uses: cereal, salads, side dishes.



Hominy Grits are the dried and ground kernels of corn that have been soaked in a mixture of lime and wood ash, causing the outer hulls to burst and the inner kernels to swell. The process yields a sweet, smoke-flavored cereal. (Whole cooked hominy is also available in cans.)

Cook: 1 cup grits in 5 cups boiling water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for 15 minutes.
Yield: 4 cups.
Uses: cereal, baking, side dishes.



Kasha is roasted buckwheat groats, or whole-grain kernels. Kasha’s strong, nutty taste has been featured in Russian cuisine for centuries. For a fluffier texture, place the dry kasha in a skillet, stir in 1 egg, and cook over medium heat for 4 minutes, then add the water, lower the heat, and simmer for 7 minutes.  

Cook: 1 cup kasha in 2 cups boiling water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for 7 minutes.
Yield: 3 ¼ cups.
Uses: side dishes, salads.



Millet is an ancient grain that dates back to Old Testament times. It is rich in protein, phosphorus, iron, and calcium. Available in specialty and health food stores, millet has a sweet, nutty taste similar to that of cashews.

Cook: 1 cup millet in 2 ¼ cups boiling water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for 30 minutes.
Yield: 3 ½ cups.
Uses: soup, baking, side dishes.



Rolled Oats are available in two types. Both are processed by rolling and drying, but one (old fashioned) is a little thicker and takes a bit longer to cook that the other (quick cooking) variety. Rolled oats are 1/5 oat bran, which is high in soluble fiber and helps lower cholesterol.

Cook: 1 cup oats in 2 cups boiling water.
Time: Simmer, uncovered, for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.
Yield: 1 ¾ cups.
Uses: cereal, baking, granola.



Steel Cut Oats are found mostly in the specialty section of a supermarket or in health food stores. These are dried and then roughly cut by steel blades. The result is a crunchy , nutty-tasting product.

Cook: 1 cup oats in 2 cups boiling water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for 20 minutes. Remove from heat, let stand, covered, 5 minutes more.
Yield: 2 ½ cups.
Uses: cereal, baking.



Quinoa (pronounced keen-wa) was grown originally by the Incas in the Andes Mountains of Peru. This super grain, high in protein, magnesium, and iron, is available in health food and specialty food stores and some supermarkets.

Cook: 1 cup quinoa, rinsed well, in 1 ¾ cups boiling water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for 12 minutes.
Yield: 3 ½ cups.
Uses: side dishes, salads, soup, dessert.



Basmati Rice is an aromatic rice originally from northern India. (A variety of it grown in the united States is called Texmati.) Its saffronlike fragrance is released in the cooking.

Cook: 1 cup white rice, rinsed well, in 3 ¾ cups boiling water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for 10 minutes (brown basmati rice takes 15 minutes longer); do not stir. Remove from heat and let stand, covered, 5 minutes more.
Yield: 3 ¾ cups.
Uses: side dishes, desserts.



Brown Long Grain Rice, which is unpolished, retains the bran that gives it a tan color and nutlike flavor. Compared to white rice, it is higher in fiber and some B vitamins. Oil in the bran layer of brown rice gives it a shorter shelf life than white.

Cook: 1 cup rice in 2 cups boiling water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for 30 to 35 minutes; do not stir.
Yield: 3 cups.
Uses: salads, side dishes, soup, desserts.



White Long Grain Rice is grown in North and South Carolina. The process of refining and polishing lightens its color and lowers its fiber content. Long-grain white rice is 4 times longer than it is wide and is fluffy when cooked as directed.

Cook: 1 cup rice in 2 cups boiling water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for 17 minutes; do not stir.
Yield: 3 cups.
Uses: cereal, soup, side dishes, desserts.



Wild Rice is the seed of a marsh grass that grows principally in the Great Lakes region of the united States. It has an intense, smoky flavor that mixes well with other, blander rices.

Cook: 1 cup well-rinsed wild rice in 3 cups boiling water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for 40 minutes. Remove from heat, let stand, covered, 5 minutes more.
Yield: 4 cups.
Uses: side dishes, soups, salads.



Wheat Berries are whole wheat kernels with the inedible hulls removed. They need to be soaked before cooking: cover them with water and soak for 7 hours or overnight in the refrigerator, then drain.

Cook: 1 cup wheat berries in 2 cups boiling water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for 40 minutes.
Yield: 2 ½ cups.
Uses: cereal, baking, salads, side dishes.