Manna Storehouse
"For the bread of God is He which cometh down from Heaven, and giveth life unto the world."  John 6:33



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Adzuki Beans (azuki beans) are small, reddish-brown beans, rounded in shape with a point at one end. They have a strong, nutty, sweet flavor, and are much used in the macrobiotic diet. They are popular across Asia, particularly in Japan, and are used to make a sweet red bean paste. In the Orient, adzuki beans are usually cooked to a red soft consistency ands served with such ingredients as coconut milk. They are also cooked with rice, their bright color tinting the rice an attractive pink, as in the Japanese, Red-cooked Festival Rice. In the East it’s also common to find adzuki beans sweetened with sugar and made into cakes and sweetmeats. After cooked, they are a nice compliment to a salad, or added to stews and soups. In the Far East they are known as the “Mercedes” of beans, being valued for its relatively low cooking time, as well as low fat, high protein, ad natural sugar nutritional profile. One cup has 44 grams of protein, 100 grams of fiber, as well as high potassium, iron and B vitamin content.

Cook: 1 cup beans in 3 ¼ cups cold water.
Time: Simmer, covered, 45 minutes (2 hours if not soaked).
Yield: 3 cups.



Anasazi Beans This attractive purple-red and white bean cooks in about 2/3 the time of an ordinary pinto bean to a creamy even pink. It has a sweet mild full flavor and a mealy texture, perfect for any Mexican, Latin American or Native American dish. Compared to other beans, it contains only 25% of the specific complex carbohydrates sometimes responsible for gastric distress associated with dry beans- so, less gas.


Black Beans (Black Turtle Beans) are perhaps best known as the main ingredient in black turtle bean soup. Their hearty flavor complements rice, fish, pork, and greens. They have an earthy, meaty flavor and mealy texture; making good use for soups, stews, salads, and bean dips. It is a favorite in South and Central America and Caribbean cuisine.  One cup has 15 grams of protein, 7 grams of fiber, and 91 milligrams of magnesium.  

Cook: 1 cup beans in 3 cups of cold water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for 1 hour.
Yield: 2 ½ cups.



Black-eyed Peas are a favorite of the South, and have a smooth texture and rich flavor. It is high in fiber (16 grams per cup of cooked peas) and the lowest in calories (one cup has only 179 calories). Popular in Southern cooking in recipes such as “Hoppin’ John” and legend holds that eating a dish of black-eyed peas on New Year’s Day will bring good luck throughout the year.

Cook: 1 cup peas in 3 cups cold water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for 1 to 1 ½ hours.
Yield: 3 cups.



Chick Peas (Garbanzo Beans) are ancient legumes. They have a warm nutty flavor and figure in many cuisines. They are popular in soups and salads and the main ingredient in Middle Eastern dishes hummus and falafel. One cup cooked has 15 grams of protein, 6 grams of fiber, and 269 calories.

Cook: I cup of peas in 3 cups of cold water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for 1 ½ to 2 hours.
Yield: 2 ½ cups.



Great Northern White Beans cook up quickly. Their mild flavor makes them versatile enough to be used in a number of recipes. They are known primarily as an ingredient in the French cassoulet (a casserole of beans and various meats) and in the American ham and bean soup. It belongs with the white bean and the haricot bean family.

Cook: 1 cup of beans in 3 cups of cold water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for 45 minutes.
Yield: 2 2/3 cups.



Lentils, high in protein and folacin (a B vitamin), are the oldest known legumes and even figure in the Bible. In Genesis, Esau sold his birthright for a pot of lentils. There are several varieties (brown, red, green, French, etc.). Lentils can be added to soups and stews. Boil to tender, drain, and dress with vinaigrette for a cool salad. Or boil until tender, drain, and reheat with oil, butter, or bacon fat for a side dish. The cooking time below is for the brown (most commonly available) type. Red lentils, which can be cooked in 10 to 15 minutes, are often used for purees; green lentils must cook 20 to 25 minutes.

Cook: 1 cup lentils in 3 cups cold water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for 20 to 25 minutes.
Yield: 3 cups.



Lima Beans (Butter Beans) were grown by American Indians between rows of corn so that the corn could act as stakes for the bean vines. This may be the origin of succotash, a well- known dish that combines lima beans and corn. They have a smooth, creamy, sweet flavor and popular as a side dish or added to soups and casseroles. Or boil until tender, drain, dress with a vinaigrette, and serve at room temperature or chilled as a salad.

Cook: 1 cup beans in 3 cups cold water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for 45 minutes to an hour.
Yield: 2 ½ cups.



Mung Beans  is a small, cylindrical seed; most commonly green, but brown and black varieties exist. They are highly valued by Indian cooks as a source of protein. Sprouted mung beans, an even higher source of protein, are used frequently in Asian cooking. Use whole mung beans in soups, stews and pilafs. Mung bean sprouts add texture to salads, stir –fries, and omlets. Mung bean starch is the basis for the transparent “cellophane” noodles used by Chinese cooks. Indian cooks use mung bean flour for breads and sweets. Wash and soak overnight before cooking.

Cook: with enough water to cover.
Time: bring to boil and simmer 45 minutes.



Navy Beans (Boston beans, Pea beans) were grown by the Pilgrims, who learned of them from the Indians. Because religious observances kept the Pilgrims from cooking on the Sabbath, a pot of navy beans was baked the night before. The famous Boston baked beans emerged from this tradition.

Cook: 1 cup beans in 3 cups cold water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for 1 to 1 ½ hours.
Yield: 3 cups.



Pink Beans, as well as pinto beans, are the bean of choice for refried beans. They are milder in taste that the red kidney bean. They turn reddish brown when cooked and often used in South American recipes and “Old West” recipes like chili. All beans are an excellent source of complex carbohydrates, with the pink beans leading the pack. One cup cooked has 47 grams of carbohydrate. They are also high in folacin and magnesium.

Cook: 1 cup beans in 3 cups cold water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for one hour.
Yield: 3 cups.



Pinto Beans (the word pinto means “painted” in Spanish) are favorites in the American Southwest, where they are used in chilies and stews. Often found, whole or refried, in favorites like burritos and tacos. Pintos are good sources of protein, magnesium, and iron.

Cook: 1 cup beans in 3 cups cold water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for 45 minutes to 1 hour.
Yield: 2 ½ cups.



Red Kidney Beans are preferred in chili con carne recipes because of their mild flavor and firm texture. Their meaty flavor and mealy texture also makes it appealing to use in soups, stews and salads. One cup cooked has 15 grams of protein and 6 grams of fiber.

Cook: 1 cup beans in 3 cups water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for 45 minutes to 1 ¼ hours.
Yield: 2 ½ cups.



Split Green Peas are favorites for soups and purees. One cup cooked has 16 grams of protein and 11 grams of fiber. Because they tend to foam when they cook, use a large pot. Split yellow peas cook in the same amount of time as the green and yield the same amount.

Cook: 1 cup peas in 4 cups cold water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for 30 minutes.
Yield: 2 cups.



White Kidney Beans (Cannellini) are popular in soups, stews, salads, and pasta. Their smooth, buttery flavor is enhanced by garlic and herbs. One cup cooked has 17 grams of protein and 7 grams of fiber, and provides more than half the recommended daily allowance of iron for adults.

Cook: 1 cup beans in 3 cups cold water.
Time: Simmer, covered, for 30 minutes.
Yield: 2 cups.